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Courses

Welcome to the UPCES Summer Program Course Catalog! Here you will find the full list of each Summer Program including a short description of each course, and a downloadable syllabus. UPCES Summer programs are designed to inspire, challenge, and motivate students to discover new topics and different perspectives.

Students enroll in ONE Summer Program containing TWO courses for a total of 6 academic credits. Courses within each program are given and cannot be mixed with courses from different programs 

UPCES PROGRAM
 

A. European Integration and Politics of Belonging in Europe

Syllabus

This course covers the main political, social, cultural, and economic factors which conditioned and accompanied post-war European integration. It invites students to critically rethink what the motivations were behind European integration at its emergence and how they have been changing up until the present. The course material includes historical texts, documents and audiovisual material.  In the first part of the course students get acquainted with the milestones of European integration and interests and positions of key players. The key reading on history is Tony Judt's Postwar – one of the few books covering both the Eastern and Western 'halves' of Europe in the period under scrutiny. The second part of the course focuses on the major driving force of European integration – the EU's outreach beyond its borders via enlargement and neighborhood policy. The final session addresses some of the major challenges facing Europe today: immigration, integration of minorities, and economic crises. After taking the course, students should have a strong knowledge of various competing interpretations of what the EU is and what it should be for its citizens and in the international system. The course consists of lectures, discussions, and simulations based on the required readings.

B. Sociology as the Surrealistic Prague Experience

Syllabus

This course offers a broad introduction to the field of sociology through in-depth focus onthe analysis of local society, as well as other interrelated issues such as social inequality, different human systems, and how people create meanings particularly when working together in a group.
Students will be acquainted with sociological terminology and key issues such as sexuality, class, race, gender, education, health care, religion, globalization, the media, deviance and crime, as well as environment from both the local and global perspectives to better interpret the surrounding world and different structures which shape our lives.
Students will build their sociological experience by embracing, what I would call, the Kafkaesque experience which is so often – and, indeed, very aptly – associated with the city of Prague and the life in the Czech Republic in the past and presence permeated with a stream of different revolts. The memory plays here an important role: starting with the nation-building stage in the 19th century, to the present-day globalization imbued with conflicting values with those established by the nation’s forefathers.
We will examine the cultural heritage of the city marked with the traces of past centuries which witnessed the monarchy, fascism, communism, and the present day democratic capitalism. This will involve some visits to different sites in Prague, which are significant for their social and historical context, as well as cultural institutions and museums.

IEF PROGRAM
 

A. Comparative Economics and Economics of Transition

Syllabus

Many citizens of European countries do not quite understand the functioning of the European Union and often erroneously interpret the development of neighboring economies assuming that their economic and political systems function in a very similar way as their own country.
The European “unity in diversity” is even more confusing for many decision-makers from across the Atlantic; many US decisionmakers are confused by the development of European economies and functioning of European institutions; and they often face the danger of wandering into troublesome blunders.

This course attempts to provide both the background necessary for understanding the differences between the USA and Europe and of intra-European differences.  At the same time the course differs from similar courses offered at Western European universities by its emphasis on a particular dimension of intra-EU differences: the fact that only some European countries have experienced a set of huge economic experiments; at first the elimination of private property (and private business) and subsequent attempts to reintroduce market economies after the 40 year long experiment with central planning. Analysis of this experience provides an insight into factors which are weakening EU consensus on vital issues.ere goes the text.

B. Economic History of Central and Eastern Europe

Syllabus

This course covers the main political, social, cultural, and economic factors which conditioned and accompanied post-war European integration. It invites students to critically rethink what the motivations were behind European integration at its emergence and how they have been changing up until the present. The course material includes historical texts, documents and audiovisual material.  In the first part of the course students get acquainted with the milestones of European integration and interests and positions of key players. The key reading on history is Tony Judt's Postwar – one of the few books covering both the Eastern and Western 'halves' of Europe in the period under scrutiny. The second part of the course focuses on the major driving force of European integration – the EU's outreach beyond its borders via enlargement and neighborhood policy. The final session addresses some of the major challenges facing Europe today: immigration, integration of minorities, and economic crises. After taking the course, students should have a strong knowledge of various competing interpretations of what the EU is and what it should be for its citizens and in the international system. The course consists of lectures, discussions, and simulations based on the required readings.

 
 

NOTE: Students may choose no more than one Summer Program.