Fall Semester Courses

The following course list is available for the upcoming IEF Fall Semester. All courses are under the Charles University Institute of Economic Studies (IES) in Prague.

Before selecting your courses, please familiarize yourself with the IEF Program curriculum.

Also note that you are recommended to complete certain prerequisite courses prior to your semester in Prague.
 

Prerequisites in order of importance include:

1. Microeconomics - One introductory-level course

2. Macroeconomics - One introductory-level course

3. At least one intermediate-level course in Macroeconomics OR Microeconomics

4. Introductory coursework in Calculus OR Econometrics (AP Calculus is accepted)


List of courses

Financial Accounting  +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

Additional prerequisites: Calculus I, basic knowledge of accounting relationships

Syllabus

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the broad principles that govern the use of financial accounting, of fundamental accounting concepts, and of the ways in which they are interlinked. At the end of the course students should be able to understand accounting information, analyze it and draw conclusions for making relevant economic decisions.

Topics in Industrial Organization +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites

Syllabus

This course provides the perspectives of top executives from important Czech firms on industrial organization. Every lecture, given by a different top executive, focuses on one specific industry and its market structure, pricing, regulation, and factors influencing market equilibrium. The course covers major industries such as private equity, real estate, energy, banking, finance, telecommunications, IT, media, public relations, construction, engineering, food, and health care

Principles of Economics I. +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

Additional prerequisites: Calculus I.
Syllabus

This course introduces economic thinking and the basic principles of microeconomics for economics students as well as for non-economists

Ethics and Economics +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites
Syllabus

This course is interdisciplinary: the overlapping topics of economics and finance, ethics, and the methodology and philosophy of economics are covered here. By the end of this course students will be able to discuss ethical questions linked with economics and finance.

Institutional Economics +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites

Syllabus
This course presents a wide-ranging and growing literature on the economics of institutions and organizations. We begin with the methods and fundamental concepts upon which new institutional economics build. Then we turn to study the institutional environment and the constraints that guide individuals’ behavior. We investigate how institutions change and how they are shaped by individuals and firms themselves.
 

European Economic Integration +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites

Syllabus
This is an introductory comprehensive course on European economic integration. Individual topics of economic integration are approached from three angles: (i) a theoretical background which helps to understand the desirability of integration methods; (ii) integration processes are explained from their historical perspective; and (iii) current problems and challenges.
 

Introductory Econometrics+
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

Additional  prerequisites: Statistics or Introductory Econometrics

Note: Offered at the Master's level but accessible to IEF students.
Syllabus

In this class we will recapitulate the basics of statistics and focus mainly on practical application of econometric techniques. For most of the semester we will be discussing ordinary least squares (OLS) models – a simple, yet very powerful tool in every economist’s toolbox. We will cover a broad range of topics: properties of OLS, testing of hypotheses, violations of basic OLS properties, some special cases. If time allows, we will also discuss some cases of establishing causal relationships, rather than mere correlations to understand some behavioral processes better. Every topic will be backed up with an applied exercise. The class is useful for those who have taken statistics and would like to understand the basics of quantitative works in economics. Econometrics is an invaluable tool for understanding relationships between variables and can be helpful in many domains of your professional (as well as personal) lives. Econometrics bridges the gap between economic theories and the real world. Be it in forecasting, testing theories, or just establishing numerical relationships between variables to inform policy, academic audience, or just your curiosity.

Microeconomics II+
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

Additional recommended prerequisites: Two semesters of Microeconomics ( Beginner and Intermediate).

Syllabus
This course builds on both introductory and intermediate microeconomic concepts. It focuses on the theory of producer behavior and market structure. Specific topics include technology, profit maximization and cost minimization, market structures (perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly), and, if time allows, game theory and behavioral economics.
 

Advanced Data Analysis in MS Exel +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

Additional recommended prerequisites:  Good knowledge with excel and basic of programing skills.

Syllabus
This mini-course should serve to strengthen and deepen your knowledge of Microsoft Excel, which will help make your work on economics and finance projects quicker and more efficient as well as enhance your position in possible job interviews with a useful skill. We focus on sophisticated data analysis, searching tools, filtering and advanced formatting.

International Trade +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites

Syllabus
This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, basic topics in international (interregional) trade at undergraduate level. The course does not deal with international business methods (logistics, use of letters of credits etc.), instead it focuses on trade theory and trade policy analysis and attempts to provide some insight into the following questions:
• Why do countries (regions) trade?
• What determines which goods will be exported/imported by particular countries?
• How does trade influence welfare?
• How do trade policies influence effects of trade on economies, can they improve effects of trade on welfare?
 

History and Methodology of Economics +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisites

Syllabus

The course aims to explain key methodological revolutions within economic theory leading to the modern mathematical economics. We provide participants with a basic understanding of the most important concepts from philosophy of science, which have influenced economic methodology, and practice of economists. In general, we are primarily interested in the mathematization of economics. We discuss the impact of philosophy and other sciences on this development, the consequences of this trend or philosophical debates within economics reflecting the mathematical nature of modern economics.

Economics of Least Developed Countries +
3 U.S. credits (6 ECTS)

No additional prerequisite
Syllabus

The course covers major approaches in development economics. It focuses mainly on the least developed countries and it discusses concepts that are important for understanding causes of under-development and poverty. After introducing traditional growth models, particular attention is devoted to the role of technological complementarities, population growth, human capital, institutions and access to finance.